The 5 Best Diver Knives of 2017

You might wonder why you should consider the method of attachment when buying a knife. The simple answer is that if you plan to attach the knife to your BCD in any way, it’s safer to go with a blunt tip/folding blade knife. The last thing you want to do is puncture or accidentally cut your BCD! You should also use a smaller knife for this method.

The traditional way was to attach the knife to your lower leg but it’s sometimes hard to reach and can easily get entangled. For this type of attachment we recommend a fixed blade knife and you can go a bit bigger if you wish.


Alligator scissor & knife
Japanese 420 Stainless Steel, Built-in scissors, Special treatment on the blade for rust prevention, Light weight, Built-In scissors can cut-it-all
$$

by All-Knives
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Scubapro Mako Titanium Dive Knife for Scuba Diving
MAKO Titanium knives team extreme resistance to corriosion with a highly durable cutting edge, Conventional edge for slicing easily through numerous materials
$$$

by All-Knives
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Cressi Skorpion Dive Knife
Available in sharp drop tip or blunt tip, One side of the stainless steel blade is straight edged; the other side has serrations along the edge along with a line cutter notch
$$
by All-Knives
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Aqua Lung Argonaut Titanium Diving Knife
4mm thick, highly rust resistant, Titanium with EDP coating, Blade is 4 7/8" long and the handle is 4 7/8, The butt of the handle is double wrapped in 7 feet of 5mm paracord
$$$
by All-Knives
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Mares 415624 Force Bat Titanium Knife for Scuba Diving
Titanium combines durability, sharpness, hardness, strength and abrasion resistance, 100% corrosion resistant, Serrated edge, Locking Blade, Blade Length: 3.5" (90 mm)
$$
by All-Knives
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Knife reviews

Alligator scissor & knife

Japanese 420 Stainless Steel, Built-in scissors, Special treatment on the blade for rust prevention, Light weight, Built-In scissors can cut-it-all

by All-Knives

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Cressi Alligator Scissor and knife

At first glance this knife looks a little like it’s landlubber counterpart, the Swiss Army Knife, however, there are some important distinctions. The blade doesn’t fold away into the handle and it doesn’t have as many features, neither of which should come as a surprise in a diving knife.

It does have a lot of features for a diving knife though. The blade handily transforms into scissors, it has both types of edges, and is easy enough to use. Cressi is a fantastic brand and you can expect a high standard of quality.

Unfortunately, you can’t have it all at once and as a result this knife is not as sleek as some others on this list.

This knife is excellent value for money considering all it’s features and is a higher-end stainless steel option.

Pros
Multi-purpose
Good grip
BCD mounts
Cons
A bit awkward

Scubapro Mako Titanium Dive Knife for Scuba Diving

MAKO Titanium knives team extreme resistance to corriosion with a highly durable cutting edge, Conventional edge for slicing easily through numerous materials

by All-Knives

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ScubaPro Mako Titanium Dive Knife

On the face of it, the Mako looks like a very straightforward diving blade but it comes with a few nifty features that are integrated very well. This knife is an example of ergonomics applied to the ultimate degree.

The knife’s design is simplistic, yet flowing and sleek. A definite upgrade from the business of the previous knife. In spite of all its minimalism in design it still comes with both edges, a thumb guard for grip and safety, and a bottle opener for enjoying a cold one after a good dive.

It is very hard to find anything wrong with this blade. In the end, the only real room for improvement we can find is with it’s sheath. It’s a bit too simplistic and you would need to find a good fastening solution.

This is the second most expensive option on this list. The features do just about enough to justify the price for this titanium blade.

Pros
Compact
Handy extras
Elegant
Cons
Basic sheath

Cressi Skorpion Dive Knife

Available in sharp drop tip or blunt tip, One side of the stainless steel blade is straight edged; the other side has serrations along the edge along with a line cutter notch

by All-Knives

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Cressi Skorpion Knife

Cressi is a great brand and this is evident by the fact that we just had to include another one of their products. It seems Cressi has a penchant for coming up with interesting looking knives and we aren’t always sure if this is for the better.

The Skorpion is a very different option than the Alligator. For one, it comes with a choice of blunt or sharp tip as well as blue or white color, the only such knife on our list but we have gone with the blunt tip for some variation. Secondly, it’s not as feature-rich as the alligator. And lastly, it is a whole 1.5” bigger, which is a lot on diving knife terms. It is important that you weigh these factors before choosing one of them.

Although it’s a stainless steel knife, the price is still a very reasonably one and makes this knife good value for money.

Pros
Variation options
Straightforward
Cons
Nothing extra

Aqua Lung Argonaut Titanium Diving Knife

4mm thick, highly rust resistant, Titanium with EDP coating, Blade is 4 7/8″ long and the handle is 4 7/8, The butt of the handle is double wrapped in 7 feet of 5mm paracord

by All-Knives

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Aqua Lung Argonaut Titanium Diving Knife

Let’s get the obvious out of the way first: this is one badass looking knife. The example in the photo is with the optional “Spartan tip” and it wouldn’t look out of place in the hands of a Spartan warrior or Batman’s gadget belt.

The black coating isn’t just for aesthetics, though. It’s an EDP coating for increased resistance to abrasion, corrosion, and many other kinds of wear and tear. For those of you that are conscious of those kind of things, it is also lead free.

The sheath also looks pretty cool and is made of Kydex and has grommets in. The handle is also wrapped in paracord for extra grip and makes the knife that much more awesome.

Be ready to fork out quite a lot of money, style doesn’t come cheap.

Pros
Best looking knife on the list
Fantastic quality
Cons
No extra features

Mares 415624 Force Bat Titanium Knife for Scuba Diving

Titanium combines durability, sharpness, hardness, strength and abrasion resistance, 100% corrosion resistant, Serrated edge, Locking Blade, Blade Length: 3.5″ (90 mm)

by All-Knives

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Mares 415624 Force Bat Titanium Knife

What you see is what you get with this diving knife. This is another example of what you see is exactly what you get. This is a foldable knife, the first on this list, that celebrates its simplicity and makes sure that what it does bring to the table is uncompromised quality.

The foldable blade is held in place by a simple to use locking mechanism, making this blade very safe to use and doesn’t make it that much different from any other pocket knife. Of course, except for the titanium blade that ensures zero corrosion or rust.

This is a lower-end titanium blade option at its current price and is reflected in the limited features.

Pros
A high quality knife from a reputable brand
Familiar use
Cons
Nothing special

What to consider when you are buying the perfect diving knife?

1. Blade material

It goes without saying that the material the blade consists of is one of the most important aspects as it forms the basis for your knife. You have a choice between two different types of materials when looking for a new diving knife, stainless steel and titanium.

Titanium: Perfect for the lazy diver, titanium knives require little to maintenance as it is corrosion and rust resistant. However it is a very soft metal, which means it’s hard to sharpen and doesn’t hold its edge very well. It is usually the more expensive option.

Stainless steel: All stainless steel blades will inevitably start to rust and corrode with time and use as they are alloys. Stainless steel blades are manufactured as 300 or 400 alloy blades. The lower the number the more similarities with titanium, while the opposite is true the higher it goes.

2. Size of blade

Bigger isn’t always better. You should take a moment and decide how you will be using your knife most of the time while diving. An important consideration should always be whether the size is comfortable to grip and use.

More casual and recreational divers will mostly use their blades to cut themselves free from ensnaring ropes and so on. For most of your dives your knife probably won’t leave the sheath. A big knife would only be a hindrance in this instance. A 4” blade should be adequate.

If you plan to use your knife for fishing and other more heavy duty uses, you can start to consider a bigger blade. Choose a knife specific to your need, whether that be spearfishing or cutting underwater lines.

3. Fixed or foldable blade

The blades themselves will should not be very different and this consideration mostly boils down to your personal preferences. A fixed blade comes with a sheath and can be drawn and moved immediately. In contrast a foldable blade needs to be opened with both hands which slows down your reactions, but is a lot safer. Again, for a recreational diver it doesn’t make any important difference other than satisfying your tastes.

4. Method of attachment

You might wonder why you should consider the method of attachment when buying a knife. The simple answer is that if you plan to attach the knife to your BCD in any way, it’s safer to go with a blunt tip/folding blade knife. The last thing you want to do is puncture or accidentally cut your BCD! You should also use a smaller knife for this method.

The traditional way was to attach the knife to your lower leg but it’s sometimes hard to reach and can easily get entangled. For this type of attachment we recommend a fixed blade knife and you can go a bit bigger if you wish.

5. Shape of the blade

When it comes to the shape of the blade there are two aspects that require you to make a choice one way or the other. First of all, you should know by know how you plan to use your diving knife and for what purpose. Keep this in mind as you make your choices.

Pointed or blunt tip: A pointed tip is great for stabbing through almost anything. It could be handy to get you out of trouble but can also get you into trouble! If not handled with the utmost care it could be a hazard to you and others and quickly ruin an excellent wetsuit.

Straight or serrated edge: A serrated edge is more than adequate and can cut through most objects you will encounter underwater. It also keeps its blade longer than a straight edge and is slightly safer to use. You can enjoy the best of both worlds as their are many blades with both edges.